According to an article recently published in Breast Cancer Research, men who are diagnosed with breast cancer have a significantly increased risk of developing a second type of cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 2,030 cases of invasive breast cancer are diagnosed annually in men in the United States, making it a fairly rare disease. Researchers continue to evaluate specific patterns and variables among men diagnosed with breast cancer and to conduct long-term follow-up with these patients. This data may help identify men who may be at a higher risk of developing the disease as well as understand their related long-term health issues.

Researchers from California recently conducted a clinical study to evaluate long-term outcomes among nearly 2,000 men who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The study was conducted over a 6-year period.

  • Patients had a 16% increased risk of developing a second type of cancer.
  • Patients’ risk for developing a second breast cancer was more than 50 times higher than normal.
  • The risk of melanoma was approximately three times greater than that of the general population, and the risk of stomach cancer was approximately two times greater than that of the general population.
  • Men younger than 60 years had a greater risk of developing a second cancer than men who were aged 60 years or older.

Recommended Articles

Image placeholder title

Osteoporosis – Bone Loss and Cancer

Breast and other cancer survivors may have an elevated risk of developing osteoporosis and fractures.

The researchers concluded that men diagnosed with breast cancer have an increased risk of developing a second cancer, particularly a second breast cancer. The authors state that men diagnosed with breast cancer should discuss monitoring and screening options with their physician regarding early detection of a second cancer.

Reference: Satram-Hoang S, Ziogas A, Anton-Culver H. Risk of second primary cancer in men with breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research. Published January 25, 2007. DOI:10.1186/bcr1643

Copyright Breast Cancer Information Center on CancerConsultants.com

Copyright © 2018 CancerConnect. All Rights Reserved.