Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-powered energy beams, such as X-rays or protons, to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy may be used as part of an overall strategy to treat stage III disease, treat single metastases, or control the cancer in individuals unable to undergo surgery systemic chemotherapy treatment.

Some patients with NSCLC are not able to undergo the surgery to remove their cancer. Advanced age and other medical conditions such as heart disease and diminished lung capacity make it more difficult for these patients to withstand surgery. Studies have demonstrated that patients with stages IIIA NSCLC who are not able to, or do not wish to undergo surgery may be treated with radiation therapy alone. Results indicated that radiation therapy alone produced an average survival time of over 30 and 34 months, respectively.1,2

Prophylactic brain radiation: Researchers have found that the most common site for cancer to spread in patients is the brain.3 These patients may benefit from radiation treatment to the brain during their initial therapy, which is called prophylactic treatment. Results of a clinical trial indicate that prophylactic brain radiation reduced the rate of cancer recurrence in the brain from 30% to 8% and the overall chance of relapse in the brain from 54% to 13%. Researchers reported that patients who received prophylactic brain radiation did not experience impaired attention or visual memory after treatment.4

Next: Surgery for Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Next: Precision Cancer Medicine for Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

References


1 Jeremic B, Calssen J, Bamberg M. Radiotherapy alone in technically operable, medically inoperable, early-stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics2002;54:119.

2 Jeremic B, Calssen J, Bamberg M. Radiotherapy alone in technically operable, medically inoperable, early-stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics2002;54:119.

3 Mamon H, Yeap B, Jänne P, et al. High Risk of Brain Metastases in Surgically Staged IIIA Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Surgery, Chemotherapy, and Radiation. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2005; 23: 1530-1537.

4 Stuschke M, Eberhardt W, Pottgen C, Stamatis G, Wilke H, Stuben G, Stoblen F, Wilhelm HH, Menker H, Teschler H, Muller RD, Budach V, Seeber S, Sack H. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer after multimodality treatment: long-term follow-up and investigations of late neuropsychologic effects. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1999 Sep;17(9):2700-9.