National Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month on CancerConnect

Sun Valley, ID & Fort Worth, TX– OMNI Health Media (OMNI) announces the launch of cervical, ovarian and uterine cancer educational […]

Radiation to the Pelvis Increases Risk of Pelvic Fractures

Radiation to the Pelvis Increases Risk of Pelvic Fractures According to a recent article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), women who undergo radiation to the pelvis for cancers of the cervix, rectum, or anus are at an increased risk for pelvic fractures compared to women with these types of cancer who do not undergo pelvic radiation as part of their treatment regimen. Radiation to the pelvis is a rather common treatment for patients with cancers involving the cervix, rectum, or anus. Unfortunately, older women are at an increased risk for bone fractures than their younger counterparts, particularly hip fractures. These bone fractures result in a significant decline in quality of life, often necessitating surgery, hospital stays, and rehabilitation. Researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine reviewed extensive data to determine if radiation to the pelvis may be associated with the risk of pelvic fractures. This study included 6,428 women diagnosed with cancers of the cervix, rectum, or anus between 1986 and 1999. The women were aged 65 or older; approximately half had received radiation to the pelvis as part of their treatment regimen, while the other half had not received pelvic radiation. Pelvic radiation was associated with an increased risk of pelvic fractures among these women: Among women with cervical cancer, 8.2% who underwent radiation to the pelvis had a pelvic fracture, compared to 5.9% of those who did not undergo pelvic radiation. Among women with rectal cancer, 11.2% who underwent radiation to the pelvis had a pelvic fracture, compared with 8.7% of those who did not undergo pelvic radiation. Among women with anal cancer, 14% who underwent radiation to the pelvis had a pelvic fracture, compared with 7.5% of those who did not undergo pelvic radiation. The majority of fractures (90%) were hip fractures. Women with anal cancer who were treated with pelvic radiation had the highest risk of developing a pelvic fracture. The researchers concluded that elderly women diagnosed with cervical, rectal, or anal cancer who undergo radiation to the pelvis as part of their treatment regimen have a significantly higher risk of developing a pelvic fracture than those who do not undergo pelvic radiation. Elderly women who are to receive pelvic radiation for treatment of cancer may wish to speak with their physician regarding possible ways to reduce the risk of developing a pelvic fracture. Reference: Baxter N, Habermann E, Tepper J, Durham S, Virnig B. Risk of Pelvic Fractures in Older Women Following Pelvic Irradiation. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2005; 294:2587-2593. ?

Stress and Depression Frequent Among Women Treated for Gynecological Cancers

Stress and Depression Frequent Among Women Treated for Gynecological Cancers According to the results of a study recently published in […]